Read Nestle’s Boost label before you buy

I’m laid up in bed with pneumonia along with  some indertiminet GI issue. I haven’t eaten much lately. 

Yesterday after not eating for two days I decided to  drink a Nestle Boost Compact drink to  to get some vitamins and minerals in me.  I’m a habitual label reader and when I read the label I knew that Nestle had a huge opportunity on their hands.

I’ve been eating a primarily paleo diet for the last 9 years and it still amazes me how much of the big three foods that I recommend avoiding are still in mass consumption products including those which purport to be healthy. 

Nestle’s Healthcare division produces the Boost line.

 It’s tag line is: 

“Nestlé Enhancing quality of life and contributing to a healthier future”

With their Boost product I think they have ways to improve the product and make it live up to their goal of “creating a healthier future”. 

The First five ingredients are filled with red flags for those who adhere to the Anscetral Eating hypothesis. The second ingredient is Corn Syrup Solids, the fourth is sugar and the fifth is vegetable oil (canola, high oleic sunflower and corn). 

These are three ingredients I avoid because our genetic makeup has yet to evolve to thrive on them. I believe there are anecdotal and some studies that are showing that these ingredients may not be the best choice for people to eat for optimal health. 

I believe that’s especially true for people who are reaching for a Boost.  Drinking one is not something you normally do if you are feeling well. 

Nestle’s is a huge corporation who is making an enormous investment in developing scientific nutritional products for everything from alzheimers to Inflammatory Bowel disease. If they begin to use less vegetable seed oils, sugar and and high fructose corn syrup and solids in their products  they could change the entire food industry and help bring down the cost of Paleo compliant ingredients.  That would inspire other companies to do the same or they would miss out on the sales that Nestle will be raking in. 

I believe that simple changes could be made to their Boost product to make it more Paleo compliant. A better option maybe for them to come out with a Paleo friendly version. That would be a huge seller. Primal and Paleo products do sell at a premium and people are willing to pay for it. 

Boost Compact is a product that provides a ton of vitamins and minerals and protein and calories that people who are sick need. Having a Primal /Paleo  approved Boost Product would open up a huge market for them. . 

The Paleo Diet was the number onesearched Diet for weight loss last year. Awareness and adoption rates of the Ancestral Diet movement is growing rapidly. People have turned to the Pelo diet to also help ease the symptoms of autoimmune diseases and other chronic modern day maladies.

Nestle is aware of niche food markets because they do offer a Boost that is FODMAP compliant. That’s a great start. The next step for Nestle is to bring out a Boost product that is organic,has olive oil or coconut oil instead of Industrial Seed oils, and uses a natural sugar like honey or maple syrup or even stevia. 

Organic foods typically sell for 47% higher price. I firmly believe that  the margins and markets are there for an Organic Paleo compliant Boost product. 

I would drink it way more often than o do the traditional Boost drink and o would do so even if o wasn’t laid up in bed.  

If you want to contact Nestle HealtheCare Nutrition and let them know you would be a buyer of a Paleo compliant Organic Boost product call 1-800-247-7893. 
Brad Miller 

Make your own salad dressing in less than five minutes 

3 ingredient vinaigrette 

Making your own salad dressing is so easy and it’s a 1000 times better for you than the store bought version. Store bought dressings are filled with highly processed and chemically deodorized vegetable or seed oil and sugar. Both of these ingredients are believed to increase inflammation in your body. And that’s not a good thing. 

This is the simple 3 ingredient vineigrette shopping list. 

Oil – Avocado oil or light olive oil

Vinegar – Bragg’s Apple Cider, Red or White 

Dijion mustard 

Most vinaigrette recipes call for the classic 3-1 oil to vinegar ration. I like mine sour and I use an almost 1 to 1 ratio. Start with the classic ratio  then adjust the amount of vinegar to taste. As far as the mustard goes I add about 1 tablespoon when making it in a 6oz mason jar. I just eyeball it.

All the equipment you need is a small mason jar or other tightly sealing container. If you use a mason jar you don’t have to use a measuring cup. Just use the measurements on the jar itself for the oil and vinegar. It couldn’t be simpler.

1.  Add oil, vinegar, mustard. 

2. Put the lid on and shake vigorously. 

3. Pour on salad and enjoy. 
It will take you less time to make this dressing than it will take for you to read this post. 

* If I want to fancy it up I add lemon juice and fresh chopped herbs from my garden (thyme, parsley, and marjoram). Another crowd pleasing option is to add  red chili peppers and chopped roasted garlic.

* Experiment with combinations of different types oils, vinegars, mustards. 

* This is also delicious on grilled chicken and grilled zucchini 

I like to make mine it in small batches which will store in the fridge and keep tasty for a few days.  

Eating fats with your salads is vitally important. If you don’t eat some fat with your veggies you are missing out on a lot of their benefits. The olive oil and avocado oil in the dressing enables your body to absorb the powerful vitamins and other compounds in the vegetables that are fat soluble. 

Stay away from store bought dressings because most of them contain industrially processed oils  and sugar. Next time you are in the grocery store read the labels. The number one ingredient will be one of the following oils, soybean, canola, corn, cottonseed, safflower, or sunflower. All of these oils are highly processed and prone to turning rancid. And sugar has been labeled a poison by some researchers because of its devastating effect on the body. 

You are eating a salad for the health benefits. If you are using a dressing from the store you are dousing your nutrition packed health promoting salad with a factory created inflammatory causing concoction. 

Inflammation is no bueno. 

Keep your kitchen stocked with these vinaigrette ingredients and you’ll never have to buy a bottle of salad dressing ever again. Your body and brain will thank you. 

I have to thank my big brother for teaching me how to make this and I hope you enjoy it as much as we do. 

Brad 

Cassava Flour Tortillas

One of the things I missed most when first transitioning to a more ancestral diet is the elimination of taco night. Now I don’t have to.

I eat Cassava Flour Tortillas at least twice a week. They are delicious. Below is a recipe that I’ve been perfecting over the last few months. It’s based on the recipe that is printed on the of Otto’s Cassava Flour bag. IMG_2655 This is the only brand I have tried so far. For me its tasty, easy to work with and is a great substitute for white flour when making breaking and tortillas.

 

This the only brand I use and I highly recommend it.

Cassava Flour is Paleo, Primal and AIP approved. I’ve also used it as a breading for wild boar schnitzel, bream, and chicken cutlets. They all turned out great as well. I need carbs in my diet because of my ileostomy. Otherwise my output is too watery which causes dehydration and a horrible burning pain on the skin around my stoma. I know its gross to talk about “output” on a recipe post, but let’s be honest, everything we eat comes out in the end.

I’ve included some pictures as well.

Cassava Tortillas 8 Servings

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time less than 20

Equipment needed:
Parchment paper, Mixing Bowl, Fork, Measuring cups, tortilla press (not necessary but I highly recommend it), non-stick skillet (I’ll try cast iron soon and leave a review)

IMG_2656

Ingredients:
3/4 cup Cassava Flour – I use Otto’s

1/4 Teaspoon Himalayan Salt or Sea Salt

2 Tablespoons plus 1/2 Tablespoon Fat – I like melted Ghee or Avocado Oil

1/3 cup H2o plus 1 teaspoon

1 Tablespoon Organic Apple Cider Vinegar

1/2 Tablespoon Locally Sourced Honey

Place dry ingredients in the bowl, add the liquids 2 tablespoons of fat and the water and stir. The dough will start to combine into one inch balls with some of the flour on the bottom and sides of the bowel not incorporated. Next I add the extra fat and water if the dough seems too dry. Normally I’ll add the extra fat. If its still dry after that I’ll add the water.

Stir again to incorporate the extra fat and or water. Next use your hands to mould the dough into a ball. It should feel soft and dry, not sticky. If it is sticky all you have to do is add a little bit more Cassava Flour at a time until the dough loses it’s stickiness.

Now you just divide the dough into eight equal portions. Place the balls onto the large sheet of parchment paper. Next get your smaller sheet of parchment paper and fold it in half. Put one of the dough balls into the center of one half of the folded parchment paper. Cover the dough with the other half.If you don’t have a tortilla press get a rolling pin and gently press out the dough into a circle about four inches to five inches in diameter.

I like to get the tortillas as thin as possible. That’s why I use a tortilla press. If you have a press simply place the folded parchment on the press. Place one ball on the bottom half then cover the ball with the top half of the parchment paper. Then press. My tortilla press doesn’t quite get it as thin as I’d like. So I add a spacer of one or two small plastic cutting boards that I place on top of the parchment paper and then press for a second time.

I place each flattened tortilla on the large piece of parchment paper. Next heat up a dry non-stick skillet on high. You want it hot. When up to temp place in the tortillas. It will take approximately 2 to 4 minutes per side depending on how done you like yours. You’ll know its time to turn them when you see bubbles forming on the surface. Flip and cook for another 2 to 4 minutes.

Stack them up on the plate. I enjoy mine as a great substitute for a flour tortilla. I like to make grass fed beef tacos with mushrooms and homemade taco seasoning. They are delicious.

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The tortillas heat up great in the microwave. You can also grill them once you cook them on the stove. That’s my favorite way to eat them. We had grilled steak tacos with fresh pico de gallo, and cilantro on these bad boys. One of my all time favorite meals.

Cassava flour is awesome but it does have about 14 grams of carbs per tortilla. It is reported to be a good source of resistant starch and only .15 grams of sugar per serving. If you are diabetic or have other issues with carbs I would do your due diligence before trying

I hope you try the recipe out. I honestly don’t measure the honey and the apple cider vinegar any longer. Its just by sight. Play around with that and what types of fat to use. In the future I want to try lard, beef tallow or duck fat too. If you have any comments or suggestions please comment below.

Brad Miller

Healthier2day.com